Study Shows That LGBT Women Have A Harder Time Getting Jobs

A new study has been published that shows just how much more difficult it is for LGBT women to get a job compared to their heterosexual peers.

Emma Mishel, a doctoral sociology student at New York University, executed the study by writing resumes that were then submitted for administrative jobs in New York, Washington DC, Tennessee, and Virginia. The resumes were constructed to come in pairs. Each pair had similar experience, background and education. The only substantive difference in the pairs was whether the female job candidate had experience in her school’s LGBT organization or a different, more traditional organization instead.

So, the key indicator was the involvement in the LGBT organization. From looking at the LGBT resumes, employers could assume that the women were either lesbians, bisexuals or transgender. In the study, Mishel referred to them as “queer” women because the spectrum was broad.

The study found that the queer applicants received call backs 12% of the time, whereas the applicants who did not put an LGBT organization on their resumes, got call backs 17% of the time. In summation, straight applicants were 29% more likely to be contacted about jobs that LGBT candidates.

Interestingly enough, the call back differences did not vary significantly between the four geographic locations studied as Mishel would have anticipated.

However, Mishel feels that it is obvious that her study “found clear evidence of discrimination against queer women who apply to administrative jobs in the United States compared with straight women of equal qualifications.”

So the question remains, what can we do about this moving forward?

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Study Shows That LGBT Women Have A Harder Time Getting Jobs
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A new study has been published that shows just how much more difficult it is for LGBT women to get a job compared to their heterosexual peers.
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