Alabama City Now Has A Worse Anti-Trans Bathroom Law Than N.C

Remember how we all thought the North Carolina anti-LGBT law was the worst bathroom law of them all? Well the Alabama city of Oxford has now stolen that, um, “honour” from North Carolina.

A new ordinance was universally voted in which will punish those who use bathrooms that do not match the gender they were assigned at birth. It is now a criminal offense for transgender people to use the bathroom for their gender identity, unless they have undergone surgery and changed the gender on their birth certificate.

The ordinance reads: “Citizens have a right to quite [sic] solicitude [sic] and to be secure from embarrassment and unwanted intrusion into their privacy while utilizing multiple occupancy bathroom or changing facilities by members of the opposite biological sex.”

It also warns that  “single sex public facilities are places of increased venerability [sic] and present the potential for crimes against individuals utilizing those facilities which may include, but not limited to, voyeurism, exhibitionism, molestation, and assault and battery.”

Each violation of this discriminatory ordinance will result in a $500 fine or up to six months in jail.

Council President Steven Waits claimed that the ordinance was passed “not out of concerns for the 0.3% of the population who identify as transgender’ but ‘to protect our women and children.”

So essentially, Steven Waits is using the rather tired and incorrect claim that transgender people who have not had surgery will use this as a way to harass or molest people. When in all actuality, it is transgender people who will be harassed,when they are forced to use the “right” bathroom.

We have already seen evidence that these laws are effecting cisgender men and women who do not adhere to gender norms, as well.

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Alabama City Now Has A Worse Anti-Trans Bathroom Law Than N.C
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Alabama city Oxford now has a worse anti-trans bathroom law than North Carolina.